Teaching Endorsements Course Descriptions

Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Endorsement

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Curriculum Plan

Complete the following:

Students who have successfully completed a Master of Arts in Teaching degree at George Fox University are not required to take ESOL 572 for this endorsement.
Examines the fundamental elements, processes, and patterns of oral and written language for the teacher of English to speakers of other languages. Topics include phonetics, phonology, sociolinguistics, pragmatics, morphology, orthography and writing conventions, syntax, semantics, and discourse analysis. English is the primary focus of the course, with reference to other languages commonly spoken by students in Oregon classrooms.
Examines various factors, concepts, and theories about first and second language acquisition processes and their interrelationships. The course also focuses on the application of this knowledge in ESOL classes for maximizing ESOL students' language development and academic achievement. Prerequisite or concurrent enrollment in EDFL 570.
Examines the diverse and dynamic role of culture in the ESOL students' language development and academic achievement. The course also emphasizes the application of this knowledge for instruction and the involvement of community and its resources for maximizing ESOL students' academic achievement. *Students who have successfully completed a Master of Arts in Teaching degree at George Fox University are not required to take ESOL 572 for this endorsement.
Examines strategies for planning, managing, and teaching English as a second language and discipline-focused content to ESOL students. Emphasis is placed on curriculum, teaching, and learning approaches that accommodate a diverse population within the classroom. This course also focuses on strategies for collaborating with educators and community members in order to provide comprehensive, challenging educational opportunities for ESOL students.
Examines principles, issues, and approaches useful for assessing the English competencies of ESOL students. Emphases are placed on developing appropriate assessment tools for the ESOL classroom and on properly interpreting tests that are used for program placement.

Complete the following:

Enrollment in a practicum requires successful completion of ESOL 570, ESOL 571, ESOL 572, ESOL 573 and ESOL 574.
A supervised practicum in an approved school demonstrating knowledge and strategies developed in the ESOL/bilingual courses. Candidates set goals for professional growth in the English-language teaching field. Prerequisites: successful completion of all required ESOL/bilingual courses (or their equivalent).

Reading Endorsement

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Course Requirements

Complete the following:

READ 530 must be taken in the first two semesters of the program.
Thoughtful classroom practice depends on sound theory. This course examines some current competing theories, looks at the implications of various literacy theories as they impact classroom decision making, and, through reading and discussion, develop a personal understanding of literacy processes. The linguistic framework of reading and its place in the language arts will also be explored.
Classroom teachers become acquainted with a wide variety of methods for assessing student progress in reading and writing. Administration and scoring of these tests will be explored. Information about how testing results can facilitate teaching and learning is the goal.
This course focuses on current methods and materials for reading/literacy instruction. The strategies used by proficient readers will be explored and teaching methods will be modeled and implemented. Methods of assessment and strategies for remediation will also be explored.
This course focuses on the issues related to public and school-based concerns about literacy learning. The discussion of issues will lead to research-based applications that can be translated into the classroom practice at the elementary, middle, or high school level.
The content of this course includes: the organization of reading programs within the context of state and federal regulation and within the structure of the school-wide program; the types of testing used to diagnose and monitor student progress; the methods that can be used to involve parents, paraprofessionals, and volunteers; and the methods available to assess program effectiveness. Observations in a variety of school settings will be organized.

Choose one of the following:

Students who have successfully completed a Master of Arts in Teaching degree at George Fox University are not required to take READ 536/537 for this endorsement.

 

 

This course focuses on the reading and writing needs of the student at the middle level and in the high school. The teaching of critical reading and writing strategies will be included as well as assessment tools. This course is required for those pursuing the middle level and high school authorizations of the reading endorsement, but is appropriate for teachers of all levels.
This course explores theoretical principles and practices based on current research. Emphasis is on strategies for coming to print, print conventions, and reading aloud. Shared, guided, and independent reading and writing is also explored. These strategies are based on theoretical assumptions from the psychology of language and cognition development and linguistics.

Complete the following:

Enrollment in practium requires successful completion of READ 530, READ 531, READ 532, READ 534 and READ 538.
The reading practicum will provide a context in which to apply methods, assessment techniques, and teaching strategies in a school setting. It will also provide opportunity for an observation of a reading program in application. The practicum setting must include assessment, teaching, and evaluation of students at both authorization levels. Prerequisites: READ 530 History and Foundations of Literacy Learning; READ 531 Analysis of Reading and Writing Assessments; READ 532 Advanced Strategies in Literacy Instruction; READ 538 Organization of Reading Programs; or by permission.

Special Education Endorsement

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Curriculum Plan

Note: The curriculum plan is prescribed and candidates will be advised as to the proper sequencing for the Special Education Endorsement courses.

Complete the following:

This course will focus on the historical foundations and purpose of special education, theory, special education law and policy, including legislation and litigation, and ethics. The course provides the foundational knowledge needed to understand exceptionalities of all kinds.
The theoretical and practical aspects of human development with emphasis on - birth through young adult – and the connection to developmental psychology and learning theory. Functional knowledge of exceptionalities: autism, dyslexia, executive functioning are developed as it relates to learning.
This course prepares candidates to meet the needs of school students with high incidence learning disabilities in general education classrooms. Develops curricular modifications and adaptations to evaluate content curriculum, and to provide assistance to general education teachers. Develops knowledge and skills to adjust curriculum content using Common Core State Standards (CCSS) and informal assessments to provide information on student progress in the general education curriculum.
This course prepares candidates to meet the needs of school students with low incidence disabilities. Candidates explore, discuss and learn how to plan and implement curriculum that includes CCSS as well as informing disability eligibility decisions as well as instruction in academic and functional low incidence disabilities including: intellectual disability, hearing impairment, visual impairment, deaf/blindness, communication disorder, emotional disturbance, orthopedic impairment, traumatic brain injury, autism spectrum disorder, and other health impairments. Functional living skills are incorporated into content planning.
This course addresses assessment and evaluation as the means for informing special education disability decisions as well as instructional decisions. The candidate will learn and practice multiple ways of assessing students. These include informal assessment, progress monitoring, formal evaluations, and standardized achievement tests. Candidate will learn to write formal reports that emphasize proper administration of assessments and ethical complications of the evaluation process to synthesize all that data to create a cohesive picture of the student’s standing, and continue to use the appropriate assessment tools to generate the information needed to make curricular and program decisions.
This course will focus on developing candidates’ ability to evaluate technological and assistive supports and determine appropriateness for exceptional learners. Candidates will design and develop assistive technology tools for use in academic and functional settings.
Candidates will gain knowledge and skills in writing effective, compliant Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) and acquire communication and collaboration strategies to facilitate IEP meetings and interactions with families. Candidates will identify key issues that could lead to litigation. Course content includes communication, organization, compliance and administrative management.
This course will focus on preparation of candidates to work with students who demonstrate significant emotional/behavioral, trauma, and fetal alcohol/drug issues and use interventions that are research-based. Candidates are instructed on the methods of behavior analysis and accommodation strategies to include development of behavior support plans.
This course will focus on the families, individuals, and community supports for individuals with disabilities ages birth - 21. Candidates will identify age-appropriate services such as Head Start, early intervention, vocational educational programs, community experiences, employment and other post-school adult living objectives, acquisition of daily living skills, if appropriate, and access to state and federal services. Candidate will also learn all required federal/state requirements for secondary transition plans. They will learn how to apply and develop an individual Education Plan for students of transition age.
This practicum will be completed at either early childhood elementary, or elementary middle, or middle level and high school, in settings with students identified with mild to moderate disabilities. Candidates will complete a work sample during this practicum. Candidates will complete a minimum of 90 hours of clinical practice in a mild to moderate disability placement.
This practicum will be completed at either early childhood elementary, or elementary middle, or middle level and high school, in settings with students identified with moderate to severe disabilities. Candidates will complete a minimum of 90 hours of clinical practice in a moderate to severe disability placement.
Individualized and clinical observation/research in an area of special interest to the student which is outside the regular offerings of the program.

Certificate in the Teaching of Writing

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Course Requirements

Complete the following:

This course provides a forum for collaborative inquiry where teachers write in a variety of genres, study current theory and research in the teaching of writing and use of writing to learn, and share their study of a selected area of classroom practice. The theory and practice of writing are examined through individual demonstration/inquiry, reading and discussion of current research, and writing and sharing in writing response groups. Participants develop their leadership potential for a variety of roles, including reform efforts that support the education of Oregon's diverse student population. Issues of teaching diverse student populations, writing to learn, and using technology to strengthen teaching and learning provide a lens for teacher inquiry. Participants must apply and successfully complete EDWR 505 and EDWR 515 for admission into the Certificate program. The Institute consists of two courses for a combined 4 semester credits.
This course provides a forum for collaborative inquiry where teachers write in a variety of genres, study current theory and research in the teaching of writing and use of writing to learn, and share their study of a selected area of classroom practice. The theory and practice of writing are examined through individual demonstration/inquiry, reading and discussion of current research, and writing and sharing in writing response groups. Participants develop their leadership potential for a variety of roles, including reform efforts that support the education of Oregon's diverse student population. Issues of teaching diverse student populations, writing to learn, and using technology to strengthen teaching and learning provide a lens for teacher inquiry. Participants must apply and successfully complete EDWR 505 and EDWR 515 for admission into the Certificate program. The Institute consists of two courses for a combined 4 semester credits. Prerequisite: EDWR 505..
In this course, teachers will study the nature of inquiry and develop a question that has arisen out of their classroom practice: a problem, an issue, or a nagging concern. Teachers will also explore the work of other teacher researchers in the National Writing Project Network. This inquiry-centered approach will allow teachers to prepare for conducting research in their own classrooms by developing their questions, planning their methodology, understanding ways to gather and analyze data from student writing, and planning strategies for using new insights in their teaching practice. Prerequisite: EDWR 505, Institute in the Teaching of Writing I.
This course focuses on using inquiry to advance practice in the teaching of writing with a focus on three major themes: supporting the writing development of diverse learners, using writing to learn across content areas, and using technology to support literacy development. Participants will implement and present an Inquiry project that includes a close analysis of student learning data. Prerequisites: OWPC Institute in the Teaching of Writing, and EDWR 505 and EDWR 515, Inquiry into the Teaching of Writing I and II.
Participants will study and discuss what it means to be a teacher leader, develop effective coaching practices, strengthen their presentation skills, and design workshops and/or conference presentations based on their advanced inquiry project and/or an area of expertise. The course includes a practicum experience for students to apply and analyze emerging leadership skills. Prerequisite: EDWR 530.
This course supports teachers in writing for publication. Participants will analyze requirements and style of multiple professional publications to inform their own writing/publication efforts. Participants will create a draft for publication intended to disseminate learning from their advanced inquiry project or other area of expertise. This course includes a three-day writing retreat followed by a series of Saturday sessions. Prerequisites: EDWR 540, Professional Leadership in the Teaching of Writing.