Bachelors (BS) in Kinesiology

Overview

The Kinesiology major offers a 59- to 61-semester-hour course of study that focuses on physical activity and how the human body’s movement impacts health, performance, and quality of life. The Kinesiology major is appropriate for students interested in pursuing careers in sport science, exercise physiology, sports medicine, allied health (i.e. physical therapy, athletic training, occupational therapy, cardiac rehabilitation, and corporate wellness), health promotion, physical education and health teaching, medicine, and wellness. The major consists of two concentrations: exercise science and physical activity and health promotion.

The Exercise Science concentration offers an interdisciplinary course of study, designed to help prepare students seeking advanced degrees or working in exercise science related fields including allied health professions (i.e. physical therapy, athletic training, occupational therapy, cardiac rehabilitation, physician assistant, sports medicine), biomechanics, exercise physiology, and other related professions. The concentration includes strong emphasis on the physical and life sciences and health and human performance.

The Physical Activity and Health Promotion concentration offers an interdisciplinary course of study, designed to help prepare students in promoting physical activity and healthy lifestyles in various community settings including schools (physical education and health teaching), worksites (worksite wellness), hospitals, and other community agencies (health coaching, personal training). Students in this program gain knowledge of “best practices” on how to encourage and measure the impact of physical activity in a variety of settings and populations.

Students are required to obtain a minimum grade of C- in all courses taken for the major.

Degree Outcomes

Graduates with a BS in kinesiology will:

  • Demonstrate an applied understanding of the form and function of the human body.
  • Critically evaluate exercise science research in order to design and implement exercise science research studies to confirm or generate new knowledge to the discipline.
  • Use qualitative and quantitative reasoning and evidence, synthesizing information from a variety of origins to methodically and systematically develop interventions to solve issues or answer questions to gaps in the literature related to exercise science.
  • Communicate effectively both through writing and orally to both lay and professional audiences.
  • Increased one’s knowledge of exercise science professions, as well as practice and learn the techniques of this specific profession.
  • Learn the skill of problem solving by using critical thinking skills as related to exercise science.
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Major Requirements

Complete the following:
Structure and function of the human body. Fall semester topics include basic chemistry, body organization, integument, skeleton, muscles, and the nervous system, including special senses. The course is designed for nonscience majors. Three lectures and one laboratory per week. Additional course fee is required.
Structure and function of the human body. Spring semester topics include cardiovascular, reproductive, endocrine, respiratory, urinary, and digestive systems. The course is designed for nonscience majors. Three lectures and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 221 Human Anatomy and Physiology I, or permission from instructor. Additional course fee is required.
The Introduction to Exercise Science course will help students gain an understanding of the underlying principles, theories, and scientific methods used in exercise science and kinesiology. Additionally, it will provide an overview of the anatomy and physiology of the musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, and respiratory system and how these systems are used during exercise. Finally, this course will help students identify career paths one may take as an exercise science major at George Fox University.
Instruction in concepts related to developing and maintaining physical fitness and movement skills.
An introductory survey of athletic training. Emphasis will be on terminology, injury prevention, evaluation, treatment, and emergency care procedures. Common taping techniques also will be presented. Additional course fee is required.
Application of human anatomy and physical laws to the explanation of movement activities. Special emphasis is given to detailed analysis of various sports activities. Prerequisites: BIOL 221 Human Anatomy and Physiology I and BIOL 222 Human Anatomy and Physiology II.
Application of exercise testing and prescription of individuals ranging from athletes to special populations. Includes aspects of nutrition, disease, training methods, and exercise responses. Prerequisites: BIOL 221 Human Anatomy and Physiology I and BIOL 222 Human Anatomy and Physiology II. Additional course fee required.
Application of principles of physiology to physical activity. Special attention is given to the effect of exercise on the various body systems and the construction of training programs. The laboratory component explores the assessment of resting metabolic rate, energy expenditure, body composition, respiratory function, maximum oxygen uptake, lactate threshold, strength and flexibility, and other physiological responses to exercise. Three lectures and one laboratory per week. Prerequisites: BIOL 221 Human Anatomy and Physiology I and BIOL 222 Human Anatomy and Physiology II.
A study of the development of motor skills. Psychological principles of learning are applied to motor-skill learning. A review of research and an inquiry into the effect of various conditions on the learning and performance of motor skills from early childhood through the adult years.

A supervised experience in the discipline, including internships and practica required for professional programs. This experience must have an on-site supervisor and a departmental instructor overseeing, designing and evaluating the content of the course. Pass/No Pass. Prerequisite: instructor's permission.

Emphasis is given to methods of evaluation in programs of physical education. Testing procedures, standard tests, physical examinations, and evaluation activities are discussed.
This course builds an understanding of the theories, methods and models used in Exercise Science research and provides the required knowledge regarding how to apply these research practices to develop a novel research question and design and implement a research study as part of their capstone project.
An introduction to the scientific study of human behavior. Major topics include the biological bases of behavior, sensation, perception, thinking, learning, memory, development, emotion, motivation, personality, social interaction, and abnormal behavior. Prerequisite to most other psychology courses.
Applied statistics for the social and behavioral sciences. Emphasis is placed on statistical logic and decision making. Prerequisite: high school algebra or equivalent.

Concentrations (18-20 hours) - choose one

Complete the following:
An introduction to life science for those majoring in biology and bioscience-related fields. Topics include basic concepts in chemistry and biological molecules, an introduction to cellular structure, function and metabolism, genetics and theories of inheritance, and an introduction to prokaryotic cells and viruses. Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week. Additional course fee is required.
This course covers fundamental chemical principles, reactions, and mode theories. Special emphasis is given to the role of chemistry in everyday life. Three lectures and one laboratory period per week. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisite: Successful completion of MATH 190 Precalculus Mathematics (or equivalent).
Mechanics, thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, wave motion and optics, and modern physics, using algebraic methods for analysis. Three lectures and one lab per week. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisite: MATH 190 Precalculus Mathematics.
Choose two of the following:
Investigation of physiological principles in animals, with 4 hours. A majors-level course is intended to meet the physiology requirement of graduate/professional programs in health-care fields. Investigation of physiological principles in humans/mammals, with emphasis on mechanisms of integration and homeostasis at cellular, organ, and system levels. Topics include muscular, neural, vascular, excretory, and endocrine interactions. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisites: BIOL 211 Cellular Biology & Genetics and BIOL 212 Organisms & Physiological Systems and BIOL 311 Ecology & Biodiversity or instructor permission.
An introductory course that provides a basic understanding in the multidisciplinary field of Neuroscience. Major topics covered in this course include neural signaling, neurophysiology, sensation and sensory processing, physical and functional neuroanatomy, movement and its central control, nervous system organization, brain development, complex brain functions and diseases of the nervous system. The course will examine different model organisms that have advanced the field of neuroscience. Three lectures and one laboratory per week. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisites: BIOL 211 Cellular Biology & Genetics and BIOL 212 Organisms & Physiological Systems or instructor permission.
This course covers fundamental chemical principles, reactions, and mode theories. Special emphasis is given to the role of chemistry in everyday life. Three lectures and one laboratory period per week. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisite: CHEM 211 General Chemistry I.
Addresses practical applications of health promotion theories. Presents examples of planning, implementation, and evaluation of health promotion and management programs in a variety of settings as guides for the development of health promotion and disease prevention programs.
In-depth study of the lower extremities including skills of injury evaluation, physical examination and differential diagnosis. One 1-hour lab per week. Prerequisite: HHPE 390 Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries.
In-depth study of the spine and upper extremities including skill development in injury evaluation, physical examination and differential diagnosis. One 1-hour lab per week. Prerequisite: HHPE 390 Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries.
Course will help students correctly identify and select the proper modalities in the treatment of injuries through research of Evidence Based Practice, modality selection with respect to the healing phase of injury, and a thorough understanding of the indications and contraindication for each modality studied. Includes a lab for practice of application of therapeutic modalities to classmates in a simulated clinical setting. Prerequisite: HHPE 390 Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries.
A study of nutrients present in food and their relation to the nutritive needs of the human body. Emphasis on the young adult, along with discussion of contemporary nutrition-related topics of national and global concern. Computer-assisted dietary analysis included.
Mechanics, thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, wave motion and optics, and modern physics, using algebraic methods for analysis. Three lectures and one lab per week. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisite: PHYS 201 General Physics I.
A study of physical, intellectual, personality, social, and moral development from infancy to old age. Will not count as part of the psychology major. Prerequisite: PSYC 150 General Psychology.
A study of physical, intellectual, personality, social, and moral development from young adulthood to old age. Prerequisite: PSYC 150 General Psychology.
A study of the unique physical, intellectual, personality, social, and moral developmental changes during the period of adolescence. Prerequisite: PSYC 150 General Psychology.
This course provides an overview of the neuropsychological, neuroanatomical, and biochemical basis for mental functions including motor control, object recognition, spatial reasoning, attention, language, memory, and emotion. Methods of neuropsychological research are explored. Recommended: PSYC 220 Biological Psychology.
A study of the nature, causation, and treatment of the major psychiatric and behavioral disorders. Prerequisite: PSYC 150 General Psychology. Recommended: PSYC 220 Biological Psychology.
Complete the following:
This course is designed to enhance the understanding of how personality, self-esteem, goal setting and behavior can influence performance and performance preparation. It is also designed to provide future teachers/coaches with coping skills and observational techniques which will serve them well in coaching as well as in managerial settings.
Addresses practical applications of health promotion theories. Presents examples of planning, implementation, and evaluation of health promotion and management programs in a variety of settings as guides for the development of health promotion and disease prevention programs.
This course considers the nature and etiology of disability and handicapping conditions, as well as the implications for and development of appropriate physical education programs.
A study of nutrients present in food and their relation to the nutritive needs of the human body. Emphasis on the young adult, along with discussion of contemporary nutrition-related topics of national and global concern. Computer-assisted dietary analysis included.
Health Promotion and Physical Activity Elective (7 hours)
This is a one-semester introductory course on the teaching profession for those planning to enroll in an MAT program or considering teaching as a profession. Students will expand their understandings of the field of education and the role of teachers through class topics and experiences. They will also participate in a 10-hour classroom field experience. The George Fox University MAT program application process and requirements will be discussed. (This course is not part of the undergraduate elementary education major.) Prerequisite: junior or senior status
Examines the diverse and dynamic role of culture in the ESOL student's language development and academic achievement. The course also emphasizes the application of this knowledge for instruction and the involvement of community and its resources for maximizing ESOL students' academic achievement.
This course provides learning experiences that will lead to the development of basic skills in Physical Education activities and sports. In addition to skill acquisition, the course will focus on how to plan and implement the stages of skill development in games through the use of extending, refining, and applying tasks. An emphasis will be placed on the use of the game stages and movement framework as a guide for designing a variety of sport game experiences for students in grades K-12.
This course provides learning experiences that will lead to the development of basic skills in Physical Education activities and sports. In addition to skill acquisition, the course will focus on how to plan and implement the stages of skill development in games through the use of extending, refining, and applying tasks. An emphasis will be placed on the use of the game stages and movement framework as a guide for designing a variety of sport game experiences for students in grades K-12.
In-depth study of the lower extremities including skills of injury evaluation, physical examination and differential diagnosis. One 1-hour lab per week. Prerequisite: HHPE 390 Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries.
In-depth study of the spine and upper extremities including skill development in injury evaluation, physical examination and differential diagnosis. One 1-hour lab per week. Prerequisite: HHPE 390 Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries.
Development of competence, style, and confidence in teaching physical education for the physical education major. Emphasis is given to analysis of objectives, unit and lesson planning, instruction methods, means of evaluation, and class procedures and control.
Course will help students correctly identify and select the proper modalities in the treatment of injuries through research of Evidence Based Practice, modality selection with respect to the healing phase of injury, and a thorough understanding of the indications and contraindication for each modality studied. Includes a lab for practice of application of therapeutic modalities to classmates in a simulated clinical setting. Prerequisite: HHPE 390 Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries.
A study of causes, symptoms, and results of stress. Introduces practical techniques to alleviate stress, promote relaxation, and encourage a healthy lifestyle.
A study of physical, intellectual, personality, social, and moral development from infancy to old age. Will not count as part of the psychology major. Prerequisite: PSYC 150 General Psychology.
A study of the unique physical, intellectual, personality, social, and moral developmental changes during the period of adolescence. Prerequisite: PSYC 150 General Psychology.