Bachelors (BA) in Biology

Overview

This major offers a 55- to 65-semester-hour course of study, enabling students to pursue a variety of careers that include research, the health professions, teaching and non-science fields that require critical-thinking skills. Students are required to obtain a minimum grade of C- in all courses taken for the major.

Requirements for the BA in biology consist of 10 to 14 semester hours in core biology courses, 8 to 12 hours in chemistry, 3 hours in mathematics, 20 hours of biology electives, and 14 to 16 hours of courses based on a selected liberal arts emphasis.

Degree Outcomes

Graduates with a BA in biology will:

  • Understand, interpret and communicate scientific information
  • Demonstrate knowledge and competency of field biology, biodiversity, systems-level biology and cell/molecular biology
  • Understand the basic forms of scientific inquiry
  • Evaluate the compatibility of science and faith in their worldview
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Major Requirements

Core requirements (41-49 hours)

Complete the following:

Discussion- and experience-based course covering scientific analysis, communication, and research. Prerequisite: biology majors with junior status or by permission.

Choose one of the following sequences:

Sequence 1
An introduction to life science for those majoring in biology and bioscience-related fields. Topics include cellular biology, genetics, systematics, development, ecology, and anatomy and physiology of plants and animals. Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week. Additional course fee is required.
An introduction to life science for those majoring in biology and bioscience-related fields. Topics include cellular biology, genetics, systematics, development, ecology, and anatomy and physiology of plants and animals. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Additional course fee is required.
Sequence 2
An introduction to life science for those majoring in biology and bioscience-related fields. Topics include cellular biology, genetics, systematics, development, ecology, and anatomy and physiology of plants and animals. Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week. Additional course fee is required.
Structure and function of the human body. Fall semester topics include basic chemistry, body organization, integument, skeleton, muscles, and the nervous system, including special senses. The course is designed for nonscience majors. Three lectures and one laboratory per week. Additional course fee is required.
Structure and function of the human body. Spring semester topics include cardiovascular, reproductive, endocrine, respiratory, urinary, and digestive systems. The course is designed for nonscience majors. Three lectures and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 221 Human Anatomy and Physiology I, or permission from instructor. Additional course fee is required.

Choose one of the following sequences:

Sequence 1
This course covers introductory and intermediate principles of chemistry. Special emphasis is placed on those aspects of general and organic chemistry that are pertinent to biochemistry. This course provides a background for students with interests in prenursing, nutrition, and related allied health areas. (This course does not meet the requirements for science majors.) Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisite: A math SAT score of at least 440 (test taken prior to March 2016), or a math SAT score of at least 480 (test taken March 2016 or later) or successful completion of MATH 180 College Algebra (or equivalent).
This course covers introductory and intermediate principles of chemistry. Special emphasis is placed on those aspects of general and organic chemistry that are pertinent to biochemistry. This course provides a background for students with interests in prenursing, nutrition, and related allied health areas. (This course does not meet the requirements for science majors.) Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisite: CHEM 151 General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry I.
Sequence 2
This course covers fundamental chemical principles, reactions, and mode theories. Special emphasis is given to the role of chemistry in everyday life. Three lectures and one laboratory period per week. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisite: A math SAT score of at least 500 (test taken prior to March 2016) or a math SAT score of at least 530 (test taken March 2016 or later), or successful completion of MATH 190 Precalculus Mathematics (or equivalent).
This course covers fundamental chemical principles, reactions, and mode theories. Special emphasis is given to the role of chemistry in everyday life. Three lectures and one laboratory period per week. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisite: CHEM 211 General Chemistry I.
A study of principles, structure, bonding, reactions, and energy as related to carbon chemistry. The laboratory stresses materials, equipment, and skills in synthesis, purification, and identification of representative groups of organic compounds. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisites: CHEM 211 General Chemistry I and CHEM 212 General Chemistry II.

Complete the following:

Complete MATH180 or higher.  Students who complete MATH 180 College Algebra are encouraged to take MATH 240 Statistics (3) as well.

MATH 240 Statistics required if MATH GE requirement is waived.

Complete the following:

Courses listed in two areas below may meet requirements for both areas of emphasis. (For example, if BIOL 390 is taken to meet the field studies requirement then it may also fulfill the diversity emphasis as well.)
Choose one of the following field studies courses:
An analysis of population, community, and ecosystem dynamics. Laboratory will emphasize field measurements, computer modeling, and behavior. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week, and one required field trip to the Malheur Field Station. Additional course fee required. Prerequisites: BIOL 211 General Biology I and BIOL 212 General Biology II.
A study of avian biology including phylogeny, evolution, anatomy, physiology, behavior, and ecology. Laboratory will emphasize identification, bird banding, and basic anatomy. Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week, and one required field trip to the Malheur Field Station. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisites: BIOL 211 General Biology I and BIOL 212 General Biology II.
This course integrates the disciplines of plant diversity, plant physiology, plant systematics and plant ecology by surveying the structure and function of plants from the organismal to the ecosystem levels. Students will receive a comprehensive survey of concepts in plant biology with an emphasis on mechanisms of development and growth, ecophysiology, identification and classification, and current global issues that are rooted in plant biology. Two lectures and one laboratory per week. Prerequisites: BIOL 211 General Biology I and BIOL 212 General Biology II
Comparative phylogeny, morphology, ecology, and life histories of several invertebrate groups and protozoa. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Some weekend field trips required. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisites: BIOL 211 General Biology I and BIOL 212 General Biology II.
Choose one of the following diversity courses:
A study of mechanisms involved in natural selection and assumptions required. Topics include history of the theory, geochronology, molecular biology, developmental biology, paleontology, comparative physiology, biochemistry, and biogeography. The interface of evolution and Christianity are examined. Two lectures per week. Prerequisites: BIOL 211 General Biology I and BIOL 212 General Biology II.
The comparative study of the structure and functional morphology of organisms in the phylum Chordata. Laboratory will emphasize dissection of representative vertebrate animals. Three one-hour lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisites: BIOL 211 General Biology I and BIOL 212 General Biology II or BIOL 221 Human Anatomy & Physiology I and BIOL 222 Human Anatomy & Physiology II.
A course in the structure, metabolism, classification and health aspects of microorganisms. Special emphasis will be given to human-microbe interactions and clinical aspects of infection. Methods of microbiological investigation are emphasized and include current techniques and experiences within the field of Microbiology. Course designed for students not majoring in biology. Pre-requisites: BIOL 221 Human Anatomy and Physiology I; BIOL 222 Human Anatomy and Physiology II; CHEM 151 General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry I; and CHEM 152 General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry II; or permission of the instructor. Additional course fee required.
A study of avian biology including phylogeny, evolution, anatomy, physiology, behavior, and ecology. Laboratory will emphasize identification, bird banding, and basic anatomy. Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week, and one required field trip to the Malheur Field Station. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisites: BIOL 211 General Biology I and BIOL 212 General Biology II.
This course integrates the disciplines of plant diversity, plant physiology, plant systematics and plant ecology by surveying the structure and function of plants from the organismal to the ecosystem levels. Students will receive a comprehensive survey of concepts in plant biology with an emphasis on mechanisms of development and growth, ecophysiology, identification and classification, and current global issues that are rooted in plant biology. Two lectures and one laboratory per week. Prerequisites: BIOL 211 General Biology I and BIOL 212 General Biology II
Comparative phylogeny, morphology, ecology, and life histories of several invertebrate groups and protozoa. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Some weekend field trips required. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisites: BIOL 211 General Biology I and BIOL 212 General Biology II.
Choose one of the following form/function courses:
Theories and study of differentiation as they apply to growth and development of animals, with some emphasis on the mechanism involved. Includes historical topics, fertilization, embryonic organization, cell induction, histogenesis, organogenesis, and developmental morphogenesis of echinoderms, frogs, chicks, and pigs. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisites: BIOL 211 General Biology I and BIOL 212 General Biology II or BIOL 221 Human Anatomy & Physiology I and BIOL 222 Human Anatomy & Physiology II.
The comparative study of the structure and functional morphology of organisms in the phylum Chordata. Laboratory will emphasize dissection of representative vertebrate animals. Three one-hour lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisites: BIOL 211 General Biology I and BIOL 212 General Biology II or BIOL 221 Human Anatomy & Physiology I and BIOL 222 Human Anatomy & Physiology II.
Investigation of physiological principles in animals, with 4 hours. A majors-level course is intended to meet the physiology requirement of graduate/professional programs in health-care fields. Investigation of physiological principles in humans/mammals, with emphasis on mechanisms of integration and homeostasis at cellular, organ, and system levels. Topics include muscular, neural, vascular, excretory, and endocrine interactions. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisites: BIOL 211 General Biology I and BIOL 212 General Biology II or BIOL 221 Human Anatomy & Physiology I and BIOL 222 Human Anatomy & Physiology II.
An introductory course that provides a basic understanding in the multidisciplinary field of Neuroscience. Major topics covered in this course include neural signaling, neurophysiology, sensation and sensory processing, physical and functional neuroanatomy, movement and its central control, nervous system organization, brain development, complex brain functions and diseases of the nervous system. The course will examine different model organisms that have advanced the field of neuroscience. Three lectures and one laboratory per week. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisites: BIOL 211 General Biology I and BIOL 212 General Biology II or BIOL 221 Human Anatomy & Physiology I and BIOL 222 Human Anatomy & Physiology II.
A study of plant function from the molecular to the organismic level. Photosynthesis, respiration, water relations, growth and development, mineral nutrition, and practical applications will be covered. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period per week. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisites: BIOL 211 General Biology I and BIOL 212 General Biology II.
A majors-level course intended to meet the anatomy requirement of graduate/professional programs in health-care fields. A course presenting a systemic approach to the study of the human body. Lecture presentations begin with an introduction of anatomical terminology, tissue classification, and developmental origins to systems. Body structure will be studied by organ systems and will include histology. Laboratory work will follow a regional gross anatomy of the human body through cadaver dissection, human skeletal collections and preserved specimens. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisites: BIOL 211 General Biology I, BIOL 212 General Biology II and BIOL 333 Advanced Physiology; or BIOL 221 Human Anatomy & Physiology I, BIOL 222 Human Anatomy & Physiology II and BIOL 333 Advanced Physiology, or instructor's permission.
Choose one of the following cell/molecular courses:
An introductory course that provides a basic understanding in the multidisciplinary field of Neuroscience. Major topics covered in this course include neural signaling, neurophysiology, sensation and sensory processing, physical and functional neuroanatomy, movement and its central control, nervous system organization, brain development, complex brain functions and diseases of the nervous system. The course will examine different model organisms that have advanced the field of neuroscience. Three lectures and one laboratory per week. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisites: BIOL 211 General Biology I and BIOL 212 General Biology II or BIOL 221 Human Anatomy & Physiology I and BIOL 222 Human Anatomy & Physiology II.
A general genetics course covering Mendelian genetics, population genetics, and an introduction to molecular biology. This course fulfills the requirement for biology majors, and is appropriate for those with an interest in current topics in genetics, including inheritable diseases, cloning, and other recent scientific breakthroughs. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisites: BIOL 211 General Biology I and BIOL 212 General Biology II or BIOL 221 Human Anatomy & Physiology I and BIOL 222 Human Anatomy & Physiology II.
A course in the structure, metabolism, classification and health aspects of microorganisms. Special emphasis will be given to human-microbe interactions and clinical aspects of infection. Methods of microbiological investigation are emphasized and include current techniques and experiences within the field of Microbiology. Course designed for students not majoring in biology. Pre-requisites: BIOL 221 Human Anatomy and Physiology I; BIOL 222 Human Anatomy and Physiology II; CHEM 151 General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry I; and CHEM 152 General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry II; or permission of the instructor. Additional course fee required.
An introduction to the modern field of molecular biology. We will examine the structure, organization, and transfer of genetic information at the molecular level and its requirement for life processes. Viral, prokaryotic, and eukaryotic systems will be examined. Major themes include transcriptional regulation, post-transcriptional events (RNA processing), and regulation of translation. The laboratory is designed to include current techniques and experiences within the field of molecular biology. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisites: BIOL 350 Genetics and CHEM 331 Organic Chemistry I.
This course includes the study of cell physiology, energetics, neurobiology, muscle biology, and cell signaling. Other topics that will be discussed are cancer and immunology at the cellular level. Laboratory will focus on current cell culturing and analysis techniques. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisites: BIOL 211 General Biology I and BIOL 212 General Biology II or BIOL 221 Human Anatomy & Physiology I and BIOL 222 Human Anatomy & Physiology II, and CHEM 331 Organic Chemistry I. Recommended: CHEM 341 Biochemistry I.
Upper-division BIOL electives
Biology (BIOL) Electives (300-level or above)

Liberal Arts Emphasis (14-16 hours) - choose one

Complete the following:

An introduction to materials, techniques, and theory related to two-dimensional design. Additional course fee is required.

Choose 12 hours of electives from the following:

Art majors given preference. This course is a study of materials, methods, and techniques used for drawing with pencil, ink, charcoal, and other drawing media. Additional course fee is required.
Art majors given preference. This course is a study of materials, methods, and techniques used for drawing with pencil, ink, charcoal, and other drawing media. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisite: ARTS 111 Drawing I.
Introduces students to materials, methods, and techniques used in painting with acrylics or oils. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisite: ARTS 111 Drawing I, or instructor's permission.
A further development of the students' knowledge and use of the materials, methods, and techniques used in painting with acrylics or oils. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisite: ARTS 201 Beginning Painting.
Focuses on the individual artistic development of students as they combine techniques and subject matter into a personal style of visual communication. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisite: ARTS 301 Intermediate Painting.
An introduction to investigating methods of additive, subtractive, assembled, and cast sculptural techniques. Students will use medias such as glass, plaster, clay, wood and stone, working with the traditional sculptural subject matter of the human figure, plant and animal imagery and abstraction. Additional course fee required.
This course continues exploration of sculptural techniques, including specific projects working with casting methods using glass, plaster, plastic, clay, and wax. Students are also at liberty to work in developing a deeper understanding of working in media such as metal, stone, wood and clay while cultivating a conceptual framework for their artwork. Additional course fee required. Prerequisite: ARTS 221 Beginning Sculpture.
This course pursues rigorous development in one’s sculptural methods. Students focus on a particular three-dimensional media while clarifying their conceptual framework with further research over the semester, creating a cohesive body of sculptural works. Additional course fee required. Prerequisite: ARTS 321 Intermediate Sculpture.
Introduction to the materials, methods, and techniques used in photography. Additional course fee is required.
Provides an opportunity for further development of skills and for the introduction of more advanced techniques. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisite: ARTS 230 Beginning Photography.
Focuses on the individual artistic development of students as they combine techniques and subject matter into a personal style of visual communication. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisite: ARTS 330 Intermediate Photography.
An introduction to typography including type history, typefaces, type selection, layout, the use of type in effective designs, and creative approaches to using type. Additional course fee required. Prerequisite: ARTD 110 Creative Suite
A focused study of design for printed 2D and 3D objects. Topics include project ideation, paper qualities, technical execution, working with print templates, document preparation, and the creation of production-ready work. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisite: ARTD 220 Tyopgraphy
Field Experience provides on-site work experience at an approved business or institutional site. Pass/No Pass.

Option 1

Choose one of the following sequences:

French language sequence:
A systematic approach to the study of French with extensive practice in speaking and writing. Three class sessions and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: FREN 102 Introductory French II or placement by exam.
A systematic approach to the study of French with extensive practice in speaking and writing. Three class sessions and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: FREN 201 Intermediate French I or placement by exam.
A thorough review of French to develop an intermediate proficiency in the language. Activities include reading authentic texts, writing short essays, and developing conversational skills. Three class sessions and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: FREN 202 Intermediate French II or placement by exam.
A thorough review of French to develop an intermediate proficiency in the language. Activities include reading authentic texts, writing short essays, and developing conversational skills. Three class sessions and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: FREN 301 Intermediate/Advanced French I or placement by exam.
Spanish language sequence:
A proficiency-centered approach to the study of Spanish, with extensive practice in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Three class sessions and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: SPAN 102 Introductory Spanish II or placement by exam.
A proficiency-centered approach to the study of Spanish, with extensive practice in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. At the end of SPAN 202, students should have intermediate mid proficiency as defined by ACTFL. Three class sessions and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: SPAN 201 Intermediate Spanish I or placement by exam.
A thorough review of Spanish to develop intermediate high proficiency, as defined by ACTFL. Activities include reading authentic texts, writing in a variety of styles, and developing strategies for communication. Three class sessions and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: SPAN 202 Intermediate Spanish II or placement by exam.
A thorough review of Spanish to develop intermediate high proficiency, as defined by ACTFL. Activities include reading authentic texts, writing in a variety of styles, and developing strategies for communication. Three class sessions and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: SPAN 301 Intermediate/Advanced Spanish I or placement by exam.

Option 2

Choose one of the following sequences:

French language sequence:
A systematic approach to the study of French with extensive practice in speaking and writing. Three class sessions and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: FREN 102 Introductory French II or placement by exam.
A systematic approach to the study of French with extensive practice in speaking and writing. Three class sessions and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: FREN 201 Intermediate French I or placement by exam.
Spanish language sequence:
A proficiency-centered approach to the study of Spanish, with extensive practice in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Three class sessions and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: SPAN 102 Introductory Spanish II or placement by exam.
A proficiency-centered approach to the study of Spanish, with extensive practice in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. At the end of SPAN 202, students should have intermediate mid proficiency as defined by ACTFL. Three class sessions and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: SPAN 201 Intermediate Spanish I or placement by exam.

Choose 6-8 hours of Global/Cultural Understanding electives from the following:

A course designed to introduce students to the nature and function of gender differences in communication on a cross-cultural basis. Examines biological, cultural, linguistic, and power theories that attempt to explain these differences. Focus given to verbal (spoken and written) language as well as nonverbal communication codes. Counts toward globalization requirement.
This course introduces students to causes and consequences of 'the wealth of nations.' Students will learn theories of economic growth and poverty alleviation. Topics to be covered include: globalization, education, international trade, holistic conceptions of development, and the role of institutions. (Identical to INTL 370 and SOCI 370.) Prerequisite: ECON 212 Principles of Microeconomics
This course cultivates skills of listening and note-taking in academic lectures, including identifying main ideas and distinguishing supporting information, understanding relationships among ideas, and taking notes that reflect this understanding. Assignments are based on lectures from the general education course in which students are concurrently enrolled. Video lab and group tutorial are required.
An intensive course to improve academic reading skills, including vocabulary, reading speed, reading strategies, and test taking. Assignments are based on class texts from the general education course in which students are concurrently enrolled. Reading lab and vocabulary lab are required.
This course provides instruction and practice in the types of writing commonly found in college courses, including the research paper, essays and essay exams, and reaction papers. Process, organization, and mechanics are emphasized. Principles of advanced English grammar and usage are applied in writing assignments.
A practical course to help students improve their academic speaking skills, with emphasis on formal speeches, group presentations, small-group interaction, and pronunciation.
A thorough review of French to develop an intermediate proficiency in the language. Activities include reading authentic texts, writing short essays, and developing conversational skills. Three class sessions and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: FREN 202 Intermediate French II or placement by exam.
A thorough review of French to develop an intermediate proficiency in the language. Activities include reading authentic texts, writing short essays, and developing conversational skills. Three class sessions and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: FREN 301 Intermediate/Advanced French I or placement by exam.
This course offers cross-cultural study designed to prepare and enhance the intercultural and international awareness of our campus community and to gain appreciation for various cultural perspectives different from the students' own. Each individual course includes in-depth study from a variety of perspectives, such as the fine arts, religion, language, natural or behavioral science or history. The course includes class meetings and is a requirement to participate in GEED 455, the actual travel to locations throughout the U.S.. Students must meet the Juniors Abroad eligibility requirements. Additional course fee is required.
This course offers cross-cultural study designed to prepare and enhance the intercultural and international awareness of our campus community and to gain appreciation for various cultural perspectives different from the students' own. Each individual course includes in-depth study from a variety of perspectives, such as the fine arts, religion, language, natural or behavioral science or history. The course includes class meetings and is a requirement to participate in GEED 465, the actual travel to locations throughout the world. Students must meet the Juniors Abroad eligibility requirements. Additional course fee is required.
A study of the world's cultural regions developed through the themes of location, human environmental relationships, movement, and regions, with emphasis on the interrelatedness of culture, physical, economic, historical, and political geography in creating the dynamic cultural landscapes existing today. (Identical to INTL 200.)
A study of the world's cultural regions developed through the themes of location, human environmental relationships, movement, and regions, with emphasis on the interrelatedness of culture, physical, economic, historical, and political geography in creating the dynamic cultural landscapes existing today. (Identical to INTL 200.)
Latin American countries from colonial times to the present, with an emphasis on the conditions that have led to the crises of recent years.
Explores the political, economic, social, and religious developments in the Middle East from the ancient to the modern era, with emphasis on the latter period.
A study of the history of southern Africa from about 1500 to the present with particular attention to the native groups of the region, Dutch colonization and British imperialism, and relations between diverse ethnic groups in the last two centuries.
A study of 20th- and 21st-century Russia and other former Soviet republics, with emphasis on their current significance in the world and the factors in their history that brought the Revolution of 1917 and the collapse of the Soviet Union.
Political and cultural developments of China and Japan.
A study of Africans in an America dominated by those of European descent.
Introduces and examines as literary texts significant works of world mythologies. Readings stress those cross-cultural themes and literary forms exemplifying the ideals, values, and concerns that have shaped our shared human condition. The course surveys myths from African, Middle Eastern, Asian, Native American, Meso-American, Oceanic, and European literatures. Universal motifs and unique differences in these traditional sacred and secular stories are examined with an eye to understanding how myths underpin cultural, community, and individual values, ethical teachings, and spiritual experiences that continue to inform the world's cultures.
Considers works written in Africa, the Middle East, Asia, Oceania, Europe, and the Americas during the medieval and early modern periods. Students examine culturally defining texts that reflect both the uniqueness of culture and the universality of literary themes. Students read a sample of texts written between the medieval period and 1900. The focus is on texts that continue to be important to the culture they represent, such as The Tale of Genji, Journey to the West, The Thousand and One Nights, The Divine Comedy, and Shakuntala.
Examines contemporary literatures across the world in order to explore both the similarities and differences in literary styles and themes. Because so much current non-Western literature is influenced by Western literature, culture, and values, students will consider historical background, including colonial, post-colonial, or political readings of writers such as Chinua Achebe, Gabriel Gárcia Márquez, Nadine Gordimer, Lu Xün, and Jamaica Kincaid.
Considers contemporary writings from women around the world. Students analyze these literary texts, examine the cultures they represent, and keep apprised of current events related to women. Prerequisite: HUMA 205 Philosophy and Literature, any 100 or 200 level LITR course or equivalent, enrollment in the William Penn Honors Program, or instructor permission.
An introductory thematic study of the roles of music in a variety of world cultures, with emphasis on listening to, viewing, and understanding a broad selection of musical styles mostly outside the Western classical tradition.
An introduction to the core issues and problems that affect the entire world, including threats to security such as war and terrorism, the rise of globalization, the persistence of inequality between rich and poor countries, and the degradation of the environment. (Identical to INTL 230.)
An introduction to the core issues and problems that affect the entire world, including threats to security such as war and terrorism, the rise of globalization, the persistence of inequality between rich and poor countries, and the degradation of the environment. (Identical to INTL 230.)
Why do wars and conflicts occur and how do we prevent these? This course considers the causes of global insecurity (from wars between countries to transnational terrorism to genocide) and examines the various approaches to their resolution, including the creation of international institutions and military alliances. Special emphasis will be placed on the role of religion in global political conflict.
Why do wars and conflicts occur and how do we prevent these? This course considers the causes of global insecurity (from wars between countries to transnational terrorism to genocide) and examines the various approaches to their resolution, including the creation of international institutions and military alliances. Special emphasis will be placed on the role of religion in global political conflict.
This course will cover the nature of culture and its applications to understanding human functioning. Students will examine their own and other cultures, as well as cultural influence on their thought, behavior, and relationships. Prerequisite: PSYC 150 General Psychology.
The biblical basis and history of missions are considered, with a special focus upon the modern missionary movement of the last 200 years.
Cross-cultural communication in Christian ministry, focusing on the concepts of identification, mutuality, the process of cultural change from a biblical perspective, and strategies for cross-cultural outreach.
A comparative study between Christianity and other prominent religions of the world, such as Buddhism, Islam, Hinduism, and contemporary kinds of alternative religion. (Identical to INTL 440.)
A comparative study of world societies and their ways of life.
A study of the historical and socioeconomic factors experienced and lived by people of differing racial and ethnic backgrounds in the United States. Specific attention is placed on the social construction of race, social attitudes and past and present racial issues. Prerequisite: SOCI 150 Principles of Sociology or instructor's permission.
A thorough review of Spanish to develop intermediate high proficiency, as defined by ACTFL. Activities include reading authentic texts, writing in a variety of styles, and developing strategies for communication. Three class sessions and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: SPAN 202 Intermediate Spanish II or placement by exam.
A thorough review of Spanish to develop intermediate high proficiency, as defined by ACTFL. Activities include reading authentic texts, writing in a variety of styles, and developing strategies for communication. Three class sessions and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: SPAN 301 Intermediate/Advanced Spanish I or placement by exam.

Complete the following:

Literature (LITR) Electives (200-level or above)

Choose three of the following:

This course helps those who want to understand and to be able to explain to others what can be done to make writing correct, clear, and precise. Focuses on constructing, editing, and correcting sentences and paragraphs. This is not a remedial course.
A course designed to provide fundamental knowledge and experience in reporting, writing, and editing news for the print media. Prerequisite: Successful completion of the college writing competency, enrollment in the William Penn Honors Program, or instructor permission.
A workshop approach to writing creative nonfiction. Introduces students to the many voices, styles, and structures of the creative essay. Prerequisite: Successful completion of the college writing competency, enrollment in the William Penn Honors Program, or instructor permission.
This course explores trends in media convergence, focusing as well on the ways reporters, editors, and designers create stories for the web. Particular emphasis will be on web-based story design, the coordination of text and art, and the creation of stories for a variety of new media outlets. Prerequisite: Successful completion of the college writing competency, enrollment in the William Penn Honors Program, or instructor permission.
A workshop approach to writing feature articles and other shorter nonfiction forms for periodicals. Student-produced material is submitted to various publications as part of course expectations. Prerequisite: Successful completion of the college writing competency, enrollment in the William Penn Honors Program, or instructor permission.

Complete the following:

An introduction to the scientific study of human behavior. Major topics include the biological bases of behavior, sensation, perception, thinking, learning, memory, development, emotion, motivation, personality, social interaction, and abnormal behavior. Prerequisite to most other psychology courses.
A study of physical, intellectual, personality, social, and moral development from infancy to old age. Will not count as part of the psychology major. Prerequisite: PSYC 150 General Psychology.

Complete the following:

An introduction to the study of society, including the study of the shared relationships that create social organization and social processes of society. Required for sociology majors and for admission into the social work major.
Sociology (SOCI) courses
Permission for this option should be sought before a significant amount of course work has been undertaken. The field should have a logical connection to biology.

Introductory course taken by majors in the field (3 hours)

Take 12 upper-division elective hours, as agreed upon by department chair of chosen discipline and biology department head. (12 hours)