General Education Classes

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General Education Requirements

This requirement is met by MGOL 407 Christian Faith and Thought (MSBS 407 for SBS majors), which is part of all majors. Students desiring to take an additional Bible course may do so as part of the humanities requirement.
The roots and origins of the Christian faith are investigated. Focus is placed on the history of Christianity, the influence of Christianity upon society, and how Christian values relate to managing people. Prerequisite: MGOL 401 Organizational Behavior, MGOL 413 Ethics for Managers.

Choose two of the following:

Students must take one college-level writing class as part of this requirement. The remainder may be completed with Speech, Interpersonal, or Business Communication courses.
An adult-focused course designed to build on student writing and research skills such as composition techniques, critical reading and thinking skills, grammar and editing, and basic research skills, and offer an introduction to APA formatting and citation.
An adult-focused course designed to build on student knowledge of essay construction, intermediate composition techniques, kinds of essays, intermediate research skills, and intermediate elements of prose, and teach advanced APA formatting and citation.
A scheduled class with topics chosen to meet the special needs and interests of students, faculty, or visiting professors.

The LACC 285 topics that may meet the Communications requirement are:

  • Conflict Resolution Strategies
  • Intercultural Communication
  • Jesus and Leadership
  • The Art of Persuasion: Tools for Influence
  • The Art of Storytelling

Choose one of the following:

This course is intended to introduce students to the skills and knowledge necessary to enjoy safe hiking and backpacking experiences. Specific skills include planning and preparation, choosing equipment and clothing, navigation, meal planning, managing risk, and using the wilderness responsibility and courteously.
The course focuses on physical activity and the development and maintenance of good health. The goal of health and human performance is to develop physically educated individuals who have the knowledge, skills, and confidence to enjoy a lifetime of healthful physical activity.
This course incorporates a theoretical and experiential exploration of the causes and effects of stress physiologically and psychologically. Students will be introduced to physical, mental, and spiritual techniques to reduce stress and increase relaxation.
A study of our nation’s current health problems and concerns. Emphasis on health consumerism and current trends, diseases, the sanctity of life, and fitness. The goal is to develop an educated view on current health issues.
A scheduled class with topics chosen to meet the special needs and interests of students, faculty, or visiting professors.

The LACC 285 topics that may meet the Health and Human Performance requirement are:

  • Lifetime Fitness
  • Nutrition for Health & Wellness
  • Walking for Fitness
  • Yoga: A Path to Physical, Mental and Spiritual Well-Being

Choose three of the following:

Students must take a total of 9 credits from the following areas: fine arts (including music and theater), history, literature, cultural studies, foreign language, philosophy, religion, and Bible.

Only three credits of applied fine arts, and six credits total of all fine arts, may be used.

This course will study the mutual influence and interaction of religion and American popular culture, focusing on themes in entertainment media, the internet, politics, sports, education, church, and civil religion. It gives attention to the ability to compare and contrast biblical Christianity with cultural expressions of religion.
The aim of this course is to understand and evaluate important developments in the history of the United States during the 20th century. This course will give attention to the influence of selected events, trends, and key personalities in politics, religion, popular culture, and technology, and to their influence and application to the shape of our society today.
Once a self-described atheist scholar, C. S. Lewis has become one of the most widely read Christian apologists of all time. Best known for The Chronicles of Narnia and Mere Christianity, Lewis wrote more than 70 books in the mid-20th century. In this course, students will read a sampling of his nonfiction and his fiction as they explore the broader societal contexts and implications for Lewis’ life and far-reaching influence.
This course is designed to encourage students to develop multicultural awareness and competencies for working with people of diverse groups in society.
This course examines how the identity of Israel was shaped by particular narratives in the Old Testament. Students will discover the influence of the social, cultural, historical, and religious context on the narratives. Students will learn how the narratives convey theological concepts and explore personal application of those concepts.
This class will focus on the artistic world of painting, drawing, and sculpture and what is considered fine art in general. Our examination of these media through aesthetic, historical and critical analysis will broaden our understanding, appreciation, and experience of art and its role in our lives. The course material will be brought to you through slide shows, films, field trips, and class discussions via the discussion board. Assigned readings will enhance your ability to "see the experience" art in a new light.
A scheduled class with topics chosen to meet the special needs and interests of students, faculty, or visiting professors.
Individualized study or supervised research in an area of special interest to the student which is outside the regular offerings of the major.

 The LACC 285 topics that may meet the Humanities requirement are:

  • Conflict Resolution Strategies
  • Cultural Anthropology
  • Culture, Kin and Community
  • Intercultural Communication
  • Jesus and Leadership
  • Music Appreciation
  • Native American Art
  • Portraits of Jesus of Nazareth
  • Social and Ethical Psychology
  • Social Entrepreneurship
  • The American West in Film and Fiction
  • The Art of Persuasion: Tools for Influence
  • The Art of Storytelling
  • Yoga: A Path to Physical, Mental and Spiritual Well-Being

The LACC 295 topic that could meet the Humanities requirement is:

  • The Global Leadership Summit

Choose one of the following:

This course is designed to encourage students to develop multicultural awareness and competencies for working with people of diverse groups in society.
A scheduled class with topics chosen to meet the special needs and interests of students, faculty, or visiting professors.

 The LACC 285 topics that may meet the Intercultural Experience requirement are:

  • Cultural Anthropology
  • Culture, Kin and Community
  • Intercultural Communication
  • Native American Art

Choose one of the following:

This course will delve into topics of Earth Science: including Earth in space, the Earth-Moon system, the atmosphere, weather & climate, rocks & minerals, plate tectonics, the building of Earth's surfaces, and the shaping of Earth's surface.
A scheduled class with topics chosen to meet the special needs and interests of students, faculty, or visiting professors.

 The LACC 285 topic that may meet the Natural Science requirement is:

  • Foundations of Biology
  • Nutrition for Health & Wellness
  • Physical Science

Choose one of the following:

Mathematics at or above the level of College Algebra are accepted.
This course will focus on problem solving using the mathematics of finance, probability, statistics, population growth, and a variety of mathematical strategies. Students will utilize calculators and spreadsheets to solve real world problems.
A scheduled class with topics chosen to meet the special needs and interests of students, faculty, or visiting professors.

 The LACC 285 topic that may meet the Quantitative Reasoning requirement is:

  • Math for Adults

Choose two of the following:

Students must take a total of 6 credits from the following areas: psychology, sociology, economics, political science, and anthropology.
This course is designed to encourage students to develop multicultural awareness and competencies for working with people of diverse groups in society.
Social media is a term used to describe many online tools that make electronic social interaction possible. Through readings, video speakers, case presentations, and first-hand exposure to social media, this interactive course will provide students an opportunity to understand how social media is changing the way individuals think, interact, and engage. Students will explore the positive and negative effects of social media on the individual and on society.
This course is a study of major theories of personality, including Freudian, Neo-Freudian, behaviorist, trait, and humanistic theories. An experimental dynamic will involve synthesis of important elements of theory, faith, and personal thought processes and behaviors.
This course explores the study of human behavior through a scientific and sociocultural lens. The foundational concepts included in this course are as follows: the history and major theories of psychology, disciplines in the field of psychology, biological bases of behavior, scientific method, sensation, perception, learning, memory, emotion, and motivation. Gender, cultural, and ethnic considerations are explored as they relate to understanding human behavior, perceptions, and emotions.
This course incorporates a theoretical and experiential exploration of the causes and effects of stress physiologically and psychologically. Students will be introduced to physical, mental, and spiritual techniques to reduce stress and increase relaxation.
A scheduled class with topics chosen to meet the special needs and interests of students, faculty, or visiting professors.
Individualized study or supervised research in an area of special interest to the student which is outside the regular offerings of the major.

 The LACC 285 topics that may meet the Social Science requirement are:

  • Basic Economics
  • Conflict Resolution Strategies
  • Cultural Anthropology
  • Culture, Kin and Community
  • Developing a Professional Online Identity
  • Foundations of American Government
  • Intercultural Communication
  • Mentoring in the Workplace and Community
  • Nutrition for Health & Wellness
  • Principles of Sociology
  • Social and Ethical Psychology
  • Social Entrepreneurship

The LACC 295 topic that may meet the Social Science requirement is:

  • The Global Leadership Summit

Your transferable coursework will apply to the categories above, or will help satisfy elective credit.

Admissions

Students must have completed some college-level credits to be eligible to take general education classes at George Fox University.

Your Next Steps

Know exactly how many transferable credits you have by requesting a transcript evaluation from your enrollment counselor through our request information page.

Ready to Apply to the Adult Degree Program?

Simply follow our How to Apply steps to complete your application to take general education classes in the Adult Degree Program.

General Education & Electives

Class length 8 weeks
Credit hours 3 credits per class
Cost per credit hour $446* (financial aid available)
Tuition cost $1,338* per class (does not include books)
Accreditation Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities
Format In-person or online
Location Portland Center (near Tigard)

*All stated financial information is subject to change.