Global Business Major

Global business majors at George Fox study at one of the Pacific Northwest's top Christian schools.

The world is fast becoming a global marketplace. Improved technology, communication and transportation have made cross-cultural trade more feasible. For those who major in global business, the door of opportunity is open to find employment in a wide variety of cultures and corporate settings.

George Fox’s bachelor’s degree in global business prepares graduates for the fast-emerging global economy. Our 60-semester-hour course of study will give you the tools to pursue work that is directly related to global commerce.

Students of our global business major are given the opportunity to complete part of their major classes through the International Business Institute program, a 10-week summer experience. They also complete an internship with a global business or company. The major’s curriculum includes courses in international trade, international finance, international management and global marketing.


Request more information about the global business major at George Fox University or schedule a visit to begin your education at Oregon's Christian university, ranked as one of the top Christian colleges in the nation by Forbes.

Jobs and Graduate School

George Fox offers a global business major that integrates Christian values.

Now more than ever, businesses must have a global reach or risk falling behind the competition. American and European companies continue to expand globally and, increasingly, companies in rapidly developing countries such as India and China are also beginning global expansion. As a result, those with an understanding and the adaptability to work in the global environment will have promising career opportunities.

  • Creative Director, Nike
  • Finance Manager, Microsoft
  • Staff Accountant, PricewaterhouseCoopers
  • Professor of Economics, Olivet Nazarene University
  • Manager, Chase Bank
  • Website Manager, Waggener Edstrom Worldwide
  • Product Line Manager, ISI, Inc.
  • Social Media Content Manager, Nike
  • VP, Credit Administration, Bank of the Cascades
  • Program Operations Manager, AECOM (Libya)
  • University of Illinois
  • Oregon State University
  • Northern Illinois University
  • Azusa Pacific University
  • Paris School of Business
  • City University London
  • The Ohio State University
  • Syracuse University
  • Colorado State University
  • Texas Tech University
  • San Diego State University
  • Study abroad through the International Business Institute Program
  • Join a field trip to the U.S. Export Office
  • Conduct research projects on doing business in other countries
  • Listen to guest speakers with international experience
  • Take part in School of Business cultural excursions
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Major Requirements

Complete the following:

Accounting is the language of business. This course provides an introductory overview of accounting from a user perspective. Its purpose is to give students a basic understanding of the logic behind the principles of accounting, enabling them to prepare, read, analyze, and interpret financial statements for the purpose of decision making. Prerequisite: BUSN 110 and Sophomore standing or above.
This course is a continuation of ACCT 271. It emphasizes the uses of accounting data by management to make both planning and control decisions. Students will continue to analyze financial statements to assess a company's liquidity, profitability, capital structure, and stock market ratios. Students will also develop operating budgets and use them to evaluate performance. Cost information will be classified by behavior, and allocated under a cost-beneficial system that assists managers in using relevant costs for decision making. Prerequisite: ACCT 271 Principles of Financial Accounting.
This introductory survey will examine the major functional areas of business and afford the student an opportunity to consider this major as a path to a career. Emphasis is given to contemporary business concepts, in particular, and examination of business as a field for stewardship.
A practical application of personal financial management and an introduction to the field of financial planning. Topics include money history, stewardship, budgets, loans, spending, housing, insurance, investments, and retirement. Prerequisite: Business and economics majors only.
Statistical procedures with applications in management and economics. Emphasis on the development of a basic knowledge of the statistical tools available for analysis of problems and decision making. Prerequisites: MATH 180 College Algebra or higher math course, or an SAT math score of 620 or higher or an ACT score of 28 or higher.
This course is designed to prepare students to meet the ethical challenges facing employees in modern business and nonprofit organizations. The course will address moral issues at every organizational level - personal, interpersonal, group, and system wide. Topics will include identifying personal mission and values; developing character; faith in the workplace; ethical perspectives, moral reasoning, and decision-making formats; ethical organizational communication and influence; ethical group behavior and leadership; and the creation of ethical organizational climates. Prerequisite or Co-requisite of BUSN 110.
Covers the legal aspects of common business transactions. Includes the law of contracts, agency, negotiable instruments, and other phases of private law.
The study of administrative policy and strategy in organizations. Emphasis is placed on the integration and inter-relationships of functional business areas (accounting, economics, finance, marketing, and management) for the purpose of developing an organizational-wide perspective. Students learn a model of strategy formulation and implementation and, through analyzing cases, apply this model to a variety of institutional settings. Prerequisites: MGMT 260 Principles of Management, MKTG 260 Principles of Marketing, FINC 260 Business Finance, ACCT 272 Principles of Managerial Accounting, and senior standing.
An introduction to the macro aspects of the social science concerned with the allocation of resources. Consideration is given to the fundamental principles of the economy as a whole, dealing with economic data, behavior, and theory at the aggregate level of the economy. The course studies topics such as government spending, taxation, and monetary policies, as well as events and issues in the global economy. ECON 211 and ECON 212 are complementary courses; however, it is preferred that ECON 211 be taken first.
An introduction to the micro aspects of the social science concerned with the allocation of resources. Consideration is given to the fundamental principles governing production, distribution, consumption, and exchange of wealth. The course studies the behavior of microeconomic units such as individuals, households, firms, and industries. ECON 211 and ECON 212 are complementary courses; however, it is preferred that ECON 211 be taken first. Prerequisites: Students must have completed MATH 180 College Algebra or higher math course, or an SAT math score of 620 or higher or an ACT score of 28 or higher.
An introduction to the finance function of a business entity. Specific topics to be studied include capital budgeting, cost of capital determination, sources of financing, leverage and its effect on the profits and risk of business, and managing the asset mix and capital structure of a business. Prerequisites: ACCT 271 Principles of Financial Accounting, ACCT 272 Principles of Managerial Accounting (may also be a co-requisite), ECON 211 Principles of Macroeconomics and college level statistics course 200 level or higher. Students who've taken PSYC 240 or SOCI 340 must also complete MATH 150 or higher, or have a SAT math score of 620 or higher or have an ACT score of 28 or higher.
The importance of thinking globally and understanding the legal, technological, political and economic differences that affect business practice are explored through readings and projects. The focus is on the global changes that are impacting national sovereignty, regionalization, and the balance of economic and political power. Prerequisites: ECON 211 Principles of Macroeconomics and MGMT 260 Principles of Management.
A study of the theory and practice of management. The course involves discussion and application of areas such as social responsibility, strategy, problem solving, communication, change, job performance, and financial/operational controls. Prerequisite or Co-requisite of BUSN 110 Introduction to Business
Study of the marketing concept, consumer demand and behavior, and marketing functions of the firm. The objective is to understand the development of marketing channels, products, prices, and promotion strategies. Prerequisite or Co-requisite of BUSN 110 Introduction to Business

Global Business Core: Choose Option (18 hours)

Complete the following:

Course provides an overview of international trade and finance. Trade theory is applied to understanding the direction of trade flows, the impact of trade barriers, and the role of bilateral and multilateral trade negotiations. The international finance portion of the course will consider the balance of payments, foreign exchange rates, and the globalization of financial markets. Throughout the course attention will be paid to global and national institutional arrangements which determine and influence trade and financial flows. Prerequisites: ECON 211 Principles of Macroeconomics and ECON 212 Principles of Microeconomics.
This course provides an overview of the field of strategic global business and its central concerns in order to develop an understanding of the global dynamics of an industry as well as the competitive position of a given firm within that industry and the underlying international market forces that shape competitive strategy. The course will focus on global strategy frameworks and review applied and theoretical fields within the discipline. Cross-cultural understanding, adaptation and communication is explored as a critical component for successful global strategy efforts. The course includes a 2-3 week study abroad component in an international setting. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisite: MGMT 260 Principles of Management
An introduction to the core issues and problems that affect the entire world, including threats to security such as war and terrorism, the rise of globalization, the persistence of inequality between rich and poor countries, and the degradation of the environment. (Identical to INTL 230.)
Managing and organizing global operations, with attention to both multinational corporations and nonprofit organizations. Consideration will be given to the strategy and structure of international business, the practices of international commerce, the challenges of living and working in other cultures, and career development in a global context. Prerequisite: MGMT 260 Principles of Management.

Choose two of the following:

6 hours required
This course offers in-depth discipline specific cross-cultural study designed to enhance the intercultural emphasis of various academic majors. The course includes class meetings followed by travel to various locations throughout the world. Students will use core disciplinary knowledge to serve, learn and interact with other cultures. (Offered in May Term. Students must meet eligibility requirements.) Additional course fee is required.
Supervised experiences in businesses, nonprofit organizations, and public agencies. Pass/No Pass.
This covers communication as it affects and is affected by language and culture. Topics include contextualized use of communication within speech communities, intercultural effectiveness, cultural communication theory, competent intercultural experiences in co-cultures (ethnic, gender, intergenerational, deaf, etc.) and global cultural groups. A student may not earn credit for both the lower-division and upper-division versions of this course.
This course introduces students to causes and consequences of 'the wealth of nations.' Students will learn theories of economic growth and poverty alleviation. Topics to be covered include: globalization, education, international trade, holistic conceptions of development, and the role of institutions. (Identical to INTL 370 and SOCI 370.) Prerequisite: ECON 212 Principles of Microeconomics
A comparative study of world societies and their ways of life.

Complete the following:

A survey of the major economic systems, including the underlying ideological foundations and institutional arrangements. The major theoretical aspects of various types of systems are covered in terms of political economy and their central organizational features. Special attention is given to changes and developments in the former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe. The European Union is covered in depth along with the major Asian economies of China and Japan. Offered at the International Business Institute.
A survey of the analytical and institutional aspects of international trade and finance. The historical and contextual elements are the foundation for the examination of current theoretical and empirical approaches to international economic and financial relations. Major areas of emphasis include international finance, international trade, and regional economic integration. Special attention is also given to the issues of globalization and the problems of economic development. Offered at the International Business Institute.
This course is intended to integrate the field experiences and presentations by guest faculty and practitioners in the area of international business management with the reading and academic work including the recent developments and literature in this field. Students will be expected to prepare analytical reports on the various firms and institutions visited on the field seminar. Major topics covered in this course include: the role of the multinational firm in the global economy; international and global business strategy; cultural adaptation and organizational behavior in the global firm. The discussion of ethical values and issues in global management will also be included in this course as well as in the other courses. Offered at the International Business Institute.
An introduction to the core issues and problems that affect the entire world, including threats to security such as war and terrorism, the rise of globalization, the persistence of inequality between rich and poor countries, and the degradation of the environment. (Identical to INTL 230.)
This course will expose the student to marketing strategies and activities that enable organizations to be competitive in the global economy and market. This course will enable the student to understand how to target global markets and how to manage and lead in the global marketing effort. Students in this course will have the option of participating in a Juniors Abroad trip that will examine marketing in three different global markets. Prerequisite: MKTG 260 Principles of Marketing.

Choose one of the following:

3 hours required
This course offers in-depth discipline specific cross-cultural study designed to enhance the intercultural emphasis of various academic majors. The course includes class meetings followed by travel to various locations throughout the world. Students will use core disciplinary knowledge to serve, learn and interact with other cultures. (Offered in May Term. Students must meet eligibility requirements.) Additional course fee is required.
Supervised experiences in businesses, nonprofit organizations, and public agencies. Pass/No Pass.
This covers communication as it affects and is affected by language and culture. Topics include contextualized use of communication within speech communities, intercultural effectiveness, cultural communication theory, competent intercultural experiences in co-cultures (ethnic, gender, intergenerational, deaf, etc.) and global cultural groups. A student may not earn credit for both the lower-division and upper-division versions of this course.
This course introduces students to causes and consequences of 'the wealth of nations.' Students will learn theories of economic growth and poverty alleviation. Topics to be covered include: globalization, education, international trade, holistic conceptions of development, and the role of institutions. (Identical to INTL 370 and SOCI 370.) Prerequisite: ECON 212 Principles of Microeconomics
A comparative study of world societies and their ways of life.

Student Experiences

Shannon Olson

“My GFU business education has given me the tools I need to go out and be equipped to work and have an impact in the world. I want to work in international missions from the business perspective, and attending George Fox has given me the skills I need to be successful. I am grateful for the experience as well as the education.”

- Shannon Olson

Nu Pham

“George Fox University has definitely had a great impact on my life. The Business Capstone course was designed to give us the unique opportunity to work with a group of brilliant people to kick-start the best business project we could think of. My education fostered friendships, honed my skills and created many memories for which I am thankful.”

- Nu Pham

Points of Distinction

  • Students will have the opportunity to study abroad through the International Business Institute Program.
  • Students will be immersed in a multicultural learning environment.
  • An integrated business curriculum creates well-rounded graduates by exposing students to multiple business functional areas.
  • Small, student-focused classes allow for personal attention from professors.
  • Students will be presented with a curriculum that is firmly rooted in business ethics.

Why George Fox?

Christ-centered community

Our faith influences everything we do here, from the way our professors teach to the way we relate to one another and serve in the community.

Global opportunities

More than half of George Fox undergraduate students study abroad, ranking George Fox among the nation's leaders in study abroad participation (U.S. News & World Report).

National recognition

George Fox University is a Christian university classified by U.S. News & World Report as a first-tier national university, and Forbes ranks George Fox among the highest Christian colleges in the country.

ACBSP accreditation

ACBSP is the premier accrediting association for business schools and programs with a focus on teaching excellence and what occurs in the classroom.